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Corinth

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Name:
Corinth
Continent:
EUROPE
Alt Name:
Archaeological Museum of Ancient Corinth
Country:
Greece
Period:
Ancient Greece
Sub-Region:
-
Date:
1000BC - 501BC
City/Town:
Korinthos
Figure:
 -
Resorts:
Korinthos, Athens,
Related:
Olympia, The Acropolis,
Epidaurus, Mycenae,

about Corinth

Ancient Corinth, the ruins of which can be found in the modern town of Korinthos, was a city of major importance in Ancient Greece and in Ancient Rome. Located in between mainland Greece and the Peloponnese, Corinth was a vital port and a thriving city-state as well as being of religious significance.

Inhabited since the Neolithic period, Corinth grew from the eight century BC under the Ancient Greeks, developing into a centre of trade and a city of great riches. Much of this wealth was accumulated from the seventh century BC under the rule of Periander, who exploited Corinth’s location in the Isthmus of Corinth. By travelling through Corinth, ships could cross quickly between the Gulf of Corinth and the Saronic Gulf, avoiding the need to sail around the coast. Corinth had the diolkos, a ship hauling device which allowed them to do just that. Ship owners were charged for using this device, providing Corinth with an ongoing flow of income.

Corinth became such a powerful city-state that it even established various colonies such as Syracuse and Epidamnus. In 338 BC, following the Peloponnesian War and the subsequent Corinthian War, Corinth was conquered by Philip II of Macedon. Throughout the classical era, Corinth had held regular sporting tournaments known as the Isthmian Games. These were continued under the Macedonians and, in fact, it was at the 336 BC Isthmus Games that Alexander the Great was selected to lead the Macedonians in the war against Persia.

In 146 BC, Corinth suffered partial destruction from the invasion of Roman general Mummius, although it was later rebuilt under Julius Caesar, eventually growing into an even more prosperous Roman city. Corinth’s decline began in 267 AD following the invasion of the Herulians. Over the subsequent years, it would fall into the hands of the Turks, the Knights of Malta, the Venetians and finally the Greeks, each of these conflicts, together with numerous natural disasters, depleting but never entirely destroying the city’s once magnificent sites.

Another interesting aspect of Corinth is its diverse religious history. Dedicated to the Greek deities of Apollo, Octavia and Aphrodite, during Roman times it was also the home of a large Jewish community as well as being visited by the Apostle Paul.

Today, visitors to Corinth can see its many ancient sites, including the fairly well-preserved ruins of the Temple of Apollo, which was built in 550 BC and the remaining columns of the Temple of Octavia. By contrast, only few remnants remain of the former Temple of Aphrodite, once a home of Corinth’s sacred prostitutes. Perhaps what makes Corinth such a fascinating site is that, due to its extensive wealth over the years, this ancient city’s Doric architecture was exceptionally ornate.

Beyond these sacred sites, much of Corinth’s original infrastructure is visible along with many remains from the Roman-era city, including the Theatre and the Peirene Fountain.

Those wanting to learn more about Corinth and see many of the artefacts from its excavation can also visit the Archaeological Museum of Ancient Corinth.

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Just as empires rise and fall so do entry fees and opening hours! While we work as hard as we can to ensure the information provided here about Corinth is as accurate as possible, the changing nature of certain elements mean we can't absolutely guarantee that these details won't become a thing of the past. If you know of any information on this page that needs updating you can add a comment above or now.

contact details

Address: Ancient Corinth, Korinthos, Greece

Phone: +30 27410 31207

E-Mail: lzepka@culture.gr

useful information

Directions:
Ancient Corinth is located just south of Korinthos on the narrow strip of land which connects the Peloponnese/mainland Greece. It is approx 53 miles northwest of Athens, making it a popular day trip. From Athens, Corinth is reached via Route 8 (partial toll road) then route 8A (exit onto Nea Ethniki Odos Athinon-Patron, also known Route 8A/E65) and follow signs to Ancient Korinthos. Trains operate between Athens and Korinthos regularly.

Ticket Information:
The Ancient Corinth site is open daily between 10 April and 31 October, 8:30am-8pm. Admission costs €6 for adults or there is a €9 combined ticket for the archaeological site and the museum together. Concessions are available.

Links:
http://odysseus.culture.gr/h/1/eh155.jsp?obj_id=3291
http://odysseus.culture.gr/h/3/eh351.jsp?obj_id=2388
http://www.ancient.eu.com/corinth/

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