Stone Age Sites and Stone Age Ruins

If you’re looking to explore Stone Age sites and want to find the best places to view Stone Age history then you can explore our interactive map above or navigate further by using the links below.

Once you’ve explored the list of Stone Age sites and selected those you wish to visit you can use our itinerary planner tool to plan your trip and then print off a free pocket guidebook. This indispensible holiday guide will help you make the most of your time exploring Stone Age ruins.

Our database of historic sites is growing all the time, but we may not cover them all. Remember, if you know of other Stone Age sites, remains or ruins, you can always add them to Historvius now by visiting our upload page.

Stone Age: Site Index

Photo by joncallas (cc)

Arthur’s Stone

Arthur’s Stone is a mysterious burial chamber in Herefordshire.

Photo by Kurt Thomas Hunt (cc)

Avebury Ring

Avebury Ring is a vast Neolithic stone circle, probably the largest in the world, and is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Photo by Jakub Hlavaty (cc)

Belas Knap Long Barrow

The Belas Knap Long Barrow is a well-preserved example of a Neolithic burial chamber located near Cheltenham.

Photo by Colin Macdonald (cc)

Callanish Stones

The Callanish Stones are a collection of Neolothic standing stones on the west coast of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides.

Photo by Jeriff Cheng (cc)

Castlerigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle is a picturesque Neolithic monument ranking among the earliest of Britain’s stone circles, its scenic hilltop setting providing pretty views of the surrounding area.

Photo by Liangtai Lin (cc)

Gobekli Tepe

Neolithic site at the top of a mountain, with large stone blocks and cap stones creating a T shaped profile, with animal and human shapes carved onto the flat surfaces of the stones. The T shaped profiles often exhibit hands and leg like carving making them resemble people.

Photo by teamaskins (cc)

Hill of Tara

The Hill of Tara was the royal seat of the High Kings of Ireland for thousands of years and is home to a Stone Age passage grave.

Rheinisches Landesmuseum

The Rheinisches Landesmuseum chronicles the history of Trier and the region as far back as the Stone Age.

Photo by vintagedept (cc)

Silbury Hill

A Stone Age chalk mound with a mysterious past, Silbury Hill is the largest man-made mound in Europe.

Photo by yellow book (cc)

Skara Brae

Skara Brae is Northern Europe’s best preserved Neolithic village and a UNESCO World Heritage site located in the Orkney Isles.

Photo by Linda Cronin (cc)

Stonehenge

Stonehenge is a mysterious collection of vast stone circles dating back to around 3000 BC and a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Swedish Museum of National Antiquities

The Swedish Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm has pieces ranging from the Stone Age to medieval times.

Photo by Bods (cc)

The Sanctuary (Avebury)

The Sanctuary near Avebury houses the remains of a Neolithic monument and is a UNESCO World Heritage site.